Old Tennessee
Old Tennessee
Old Tennessee
Trail

Old Tennessee

General Area
Nashville
Stops
98
Old Tennessee
Old Tennessee

Take a scenic drive as rich in history as it is in fresh air, gently rolling hills, and down-home charm. Stop to explore small Tennessee towns to uncover the story of Middle Tennessee, from Native Americans to westbound settlers, Civil War soldiers and beyond.

Williamson County Visitor Center

Point of Interest

Stop in for maps and info on self-guided walking tours, including the Franklin Tour iPad App and Franklin on Foot guided tours with subjects like history, Civil War and ghost stories. You'll also find Old Tennessee Trail and The Jack Trail self-guided driving tour brochures.

Add to TripRemoveWilliamson County Visitor Center

400 Main St.
Suite 130
37064 TN
United States

Franklin Town Square and Monument

Point of Interest

This monument was erected in 1899 to honor Tennessee's Confederate soldiers of the Civil War.

Add to TripRemoveFranklin Town Square and Monument

3rd Ave. N
37064 TN
United States

Gentry Farm

Farms & Orchards

In the fall, stop to pick a pumpkin, explore a corn maze, and experience rural life. This land has been owned by the Gentry family since 1849, and its 400 acres remain a working farm with three Civil War-era homes (Private Residences). Open weekends, end of Sept.-Oct.

Add to TripRemoveGentry Farm

1974 New Hwy. 96 West
Franklin, TN 37064

6157944368

Visit Website

Leiper's Fork

Tours

This is the only historic village on the Tennessee portion of the Natchez Trace Parkway. Originally named "Bentonville," it was founded by Thomas Hart Benton's mother and grew around a store, a log school and church. Stop here and experience historic architecture and modern charm, where a fine art gallery is a neighbor to a grocery store that moonlights as a music venue. This special place is home to farmers, talented artists and musicians (yes, some very famous) who appreciate its down-home feel and peaceful rolling hills.

Add to TripRemoveLeiper's Fork

4151 Old HIllsboro Rd.
Franklin, TN 37064

615-591-8514

Visit Website

Puckett's Grocery Leiper's Fork

Restaurants

Happily serving Leiper's Fork as a restaurant, grocery and meeting place since the 1950s, locals and celebrities alike take the stage and enjoy the famous burgers.

Add to TripRemovePuckett's Grocery Leiper's Fork

4142 Old Hillsboro Rd.
Franklin, TN 37064

(615) 794-1308

Visit Website

Sweeney-Powell House

Point of Interest

This 1882 home was originally built for the Sam Sweeney family and now houses offices.

Add to TripRemoveSweeney-Powell House

4154 Old Hillsboro Rd.
37064 TN
United States

Leiper's Fork Market

Point of Interest

Stop in for a snack and a walk back in time as you view historic photos and stories of the area on the walls of this convenience store.

Add to TripRemoveLeiper's Fork Market

4348 Old Hillsboro Road
37064 TN
United States

Garrison Road

Point of Interest

The road takes its name after the 1801 military post established here to enforce the 1785 Indian Treaty's Tennessee Valley Divide boundary, allotting the Cherokee space for hunting grounds stretching into Kentucky, North Carolina and South Carolina.

Add to TripRemoveGarrison Road

5379 Old Hillsboro Rd.
37064 TN
United States

Nett's Country Store

Point of Interest

A slight turn onto Skelley Road brings you to this down-home country store and restaurant serving up delicious homemade pies, great cooking, and live music from time to time.

Add to TripRemoveNett's Country Store

4356 Skelley Rd.
38482 TN
United States

Papa Boudreaux's Cajun Cafe

Point of Interest

Straight from New Orleans, "Papa" relocated to Tennessee and at the urging of friends who love his authentic recipes, opened a Cajun restaurant on his Santa Fe property. This colorful gem is going to surprise you!

Add to TripRemovePapa Boudreaux's Cajun Cafe

3419 Fly Road
38482 TN
United States

Fly Community and Store

Point of Interest

Enter into the unincorporated and primarily agricultural community of Fly, Tennessee, just outside of Santa Fe. Opened by members of the Fly family, original settlers in the area, Fly's General Store opened in 1906 and is still known by its original name. Neighboring Fly Nazarene Church also anchors the fly community.

Add to TripRemoveFly Community and Store

5661 Leipers Creek Rd.
38482 TN
United States

Spout Spring

Point of Interest

As you continue down Hwy 7, notice Spout Spring (L). It was a drinking water source for Middle Tennessee Railroad, which ran through the area.

Add to TripRemoveSpout Spring

5668 Leipers Creek Rd.
38482 TN
United States

Water Valley Community

Point of Interest

This was one of Maury County's first settlements, and the earliest marked grave (Sarah Fly, 1808) in the county lies here. In 1824, Water Valley had 61 voters and paid taxes on 14 slaves. This is a classic country drive, with stunning colors in the fall.

Add to TripRemoveWater Valley Community

4849 Leipers Creek Rd.
38487 TN
United States

Water Valley Community Center

Point of Interest

At this corner, find the Water Valley Community Center where dances are still held every week.

Add to TripRemoveWater Valley Community Center

4849 Leipers Creek Rd.
38487 TN
United States

Historic Church

Point of Interest

Beautiful scenery marks this stretch of the Old Tennessee Trail. Note the historic church (L) as you stay with Leipers Creek Road, and imagine yourself here in the early 1800s as the area was being settled and farms were being established. Relax as you take in the Tennessee countryside.

Add to TripRemoveHistoric Church

4738 Leipers Creek Rd.
38487 TN
United States

Duck River Bottomland

Point of Interest

Your scenic drive continues on Snow Creek Road near the Duck River bottomland (L). You'll pass a pre-Civil War Greek Revival home and other historic structures as you approach the river and cross the bridge.

Add to TripRemoveDuck River Bottomland

3978 Snow Creek Road
38487 TN
United States

Jonathan Webster Home

Point of Interest

The historic 1808 home of the Revolutionary War veteran Jonathan Webster.

Add to TripRemoveJonathan Webster Home

3166 Hampshire Pike
38474 TN
United States

Zion Presbyterian Church

Point of Interest

The church was organized in 1807 by 11 descendant families of Scottish and Scotch-Irish Presbyterians who originally immigrated to South Carolina around 1731. It was located in the center of the 5,120 acres purchased from General Nathanael Greene's land grant from the Revolutionary War. These pioneer settlers erected the first church on the site even before building their own homes. Zion Church has served as the religious and social center of the community continuously to the present time. The current building was built in 1849.

Add to TripRemoveZion Presbyterian Church

2322 Zion Rd
38401 TN
United States

Mount Pleasant Confederate Monument

Point of Interest

This memorial to all Confederate soldiers is also a tribute to Mount Pleasant's "Bigby Greys," the town's finest young soldiers. It was here that the group gathered to receive the banner they would carry into battle, which is now on display at the Museum.

Add to TripRemoveMount Pleasant Confederate Monument

100 Public Square
38474 TN
United States

Rattle and Snap

Point of Interest

William Polk, original owner of the property, won 5,648 acres of land in a game of chance called "Rattle and Snap" and divided it between his four sons. George Polk built this mansion, named after the game and known as one of the best examples of Greek Revival residential architecture in the country. The home is open to the public for tours (advance reservations required, admission charged). The Carriage House on the property is available for overnight stays. It is one of two National Historic Landmarks in Maury County.

Add to TripRemoveRattle and Snap

1522 N. Main St.
38474 TN
United States

Hamilton Place

Point of Interest

This excellent 1832 example of Palladian-style architecture was the first of the four homes to be built on William Polk's original tract. The wealth required to build these magnificent homes was tied directly to the fertile soil, as the Polks became very successful plantation owners. Hamilton Place was built by Lucius Polk for his wife, Mary Ann Eastin, shortly after they were married in the White House during Andrew Jackson's presidency. Now a private residence on the National Register of Historic Places, Hamilton Place is one of the two remaining homes on the original land. Westbrook (Rufus Polk) and Ashwood Hall (Leonidas Polk) no longer stand.

Add to TripRemoveHamilton Place

1605 N. Main St.
TN
United States

St. John's Church

Point of Interest

This 1842 church was built where the Polk sons' properties met. Leonidas, an Episcopal Priest, convinced the other brothers to build a church on the land. As the Confederates passed by on their way to the Battle of Franklin, General Patrick Cleburne remarked that it was "almost worth dying to be buried in such a beautiful spot." When General Cleburne was killed in the Battle of Franklin, his body was interred here temporarily, along with two other generals (Strahl and Granbury). The cemetery also serves as the traditional burial ground for Episcopal Bishops of Tennessee.

Add to TripRemoveSt. John's Church

6497 Trotwood Ave.
38401 TN
United States

Athenaeum

Point of Interest

Constructed in 1835 as a private residence, in 1852 it became the rectory of The Athenaeum, one of the most highly regarded girls' schools in the South. Its 22-acre campus enrolled about 125 female boarding students at a time, until its closing in 1904. The architecture is a blend of styles, from Gothic and Greek Revival to Italianate and Moorish. Tours available.

Add to TripRemoveAthenaeum

808 Athenaeum Street
P. 0. Box 942
38402 TN
United States

James K. Polk Home

Point of Interest

This is the only surviving home (excluding the White House) of James Knox Polk, 11th president of the U.S. This Federal-style structure was built by his father, Samuel, and James K. Polk lived here between 1818 and 1824, continuing to visit his mother here frequently until his own death in 1849. Tour this National Historic Landmark and two other structures on the property to see over 1,300 artifacts and mementos from Polk's life, including original furniture and White House china.

Add to TripRemoveJames K. Polk Home

301 West Seventh Street
P. 0. Box 741
38402 TN
United States

Polk Presidential Hall

Point of Interest

This addition to the Polk Home campus is housed in a restored 1882 vernacular gothic Christian Church building. Here you will see more personal artifacts from Polk's life, and from time to time, traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian Institute.

Add to TripRemovePolk Presidential Hall

810 High St.
38402 TN
United States

Experience Maury

History

Continue on Public Sq. and take 1st R onto 7th St. to pt. 78.

Add to TripRemoveExperience Maury

302 W. 7th St.
Columbia, TN 38401

931-381-7176

Visit Website

Polk's Boyhood Home

Point of Interest

In about 6.3 miles, you'll pass the historic site of Polk's Boyhood Home (R), which no longer stands. In another 2 miles, you'll pass the University of Tennessee Agriculture Research & Education Center (R). Since 1917, this 1,263-acre facility has conducted research in crops and trees, production efficiency, and beef and dairy cattle.

Add to TripRemovePolk's Boyhood Home

1000 Main Entrance Dr.
37174 TN
United States

Rippavilla Plantation

Civil War

This magnificent 1853 mansion was built by Nathaniel Frances Cheairs IV, a Civil War colonel in the Confederate Army and the very man that carried the surrender flag at Fort Donelson in 1862. The property was purchased by the Saturn Corporation in the 1980s and donated to Maury County. The Tennessee Museum of Early Farm Life is located on the grounds in two salvaged barns. Open for tours.

Add to TripRemoveRippavilla Plantation

5700 Main St.
Spring Hill, TN 37174

931-486-9037

Visit Website

Oaklawn

Point of Interest

The peaceful estate you see today served as the headquarters for Confederate General Hood on the night of the Union's inexplicable retreat to Franklin from the Spring Hill battlefield. Badly injured and believed to be sedated for pain, General Hood slept here while the Union Army slipped through the Confederates' grasp. Oaklawn was once the home of by country music legends George Jones and Tammy Wynette.

Add to TripRemoveOaklawn

3331 Denning Lane
37174 TN
United States

Homestead Manor

History

Much of the hard fighting in the Battle of Thompson's Station took place on this property. The 1809 home sheltered many local women and children in its cellar as the battle took place. While watching the action from the cellar window, 17-year-old Alice Thompson saw the Confederate color-bearer shot down and bolted from the house to lift up the flag. Her courage inspired the Confederate soldiers to rally and defeat the Union. The property has a conservation easement from The Land Trust for Tennessee and a foundation has been started for Thompson's Station Battlefield Park.

Add to TripRemoveHomestead Manor

4683 Columbia Pk.
Thompson's Station, TN 37179

615-790-2309

Visit Website

Laurel Hill

Point of Interest

This 1854 home gets its name from the mountain laurel that once grew on the lawn and surrounding property. The thin columns are architecturally unusual for the area, and its interior is said to boast solid wood floors of ash, poplar, and walnut over two-and-a-half inches thick. General Hood's officers stopped here on their way to the fateful Battle of Franklin. It is a private residence.

Add to TripRemoveLaurel Hill

4329 Columbia Pk.
37064 TN
United States

The Harrison House

Point of Interest

This 1848 home became General Hood's headquarters during the Battle of Franklin. Outlining the plan of attack on November 30, Generals Hood and Forrest engaged in an argument here about military tactics, leaving Forrest in a rage and sealing the Confederacy's fate with Hood's disastrous plan. This was a place where wounded soldiers were brought and some buried. Today, the Harrison House remains a private residence.

Add to TripRemoveThe Harrison House

4800 Columbia Pk.
37064 TN
United States

Carnton Plantation and McGavock Confederate Cemetery

Point of Interest

This Antebellum mansion dates back to 1826, built by former Nashville Mayor Randal McGavock. During the Civil War, it was the home of Colonel John and Carrie McGavock, featured in the best-selling novel "Widow of the South." Just a few hundred yards from the front lines of battle, the home served as a hospital during the Battle of Franklin, and its wood floors still show blood stains from the more than 300 soldiers brought in that day. Generals Cleburne, Granbury, Adams and Strahl's bodies laid on the back porch after the battle. The adjacent McGavock Confederate Cemetery contains 1,500 graves, the largest private Confederate cemetery in the U.S. Today, the plantation is restored, open for public tours, and is used for private and community events.

Add to TripRemoveCarnton Plantation and McGavock Confederate Cemetery

1345 Carnton Lane
37064 TN
United States

Carter House

Point of Interest

This 1830 house and its buildings hold more than a thousand bullet holes, received during the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864. In fact, the farm office on the property is known to be the most bullet-damaged building still standing from the Civil War. Some of the bloodiest hand-to-hand combat took place right here, as the Carter family hid in the basement for safety. Today, the Carter House, its buildings, and eight acres of its property are preserved and open to the public, including a fascinating museum, gift shop and guided tours.

Add to TripRemoveCarter House

1140 Columbia Avenue
37064 TN
United States

Lotz House

Bed & Breakfast

You'll find beautifully designed fireplaces, well-preserved antique furnishings and decorative arts from the 1820s to the 1860s in this 1858 home, as well as cannonball scars from the Battle of Franklin. The Lotz family stayed safe across the street in the basement of the Carter home during the bloody battle, emerging to find bodies "so thick you couldn't take a step without walking on one of them." Pickets from the Lotz family's fence were used by the soldiers to build barricades, and blood from both sides still stains the floors, as the house was used as a military hospital for several months following the battle. "Battlefield Walking Tours" are led here by Thomas Cartwright, a leading authority on the Battle of Franklin.

Add to TripRemoveLotz House

1111 Columbia Ave.
Franklin, TN 37064

615-790-7190

Visit Website

Downtown Franklin

Shopping

Back in downtown Franklin, the Old Tennessee Trail ends where it began. This town square holds dozens of unique shopping and dining experiences, but remains true to its Main Street identity, with brick sidewalks and beautifully restored buildings in the 16-block historic district. Today, it's an upscale suburb of Nashville, named to Southern Living's "Best Small Town" top 10 list. Now that you have a sense of the area's rich history, take in the town square with a new perspective. Walk these streets and imagine the events, people and culture that have shaped it for hundreds of years.

Add to TripRemoveDowntown Franklin

109 3rd Ave. South
Franklin, TN 37064

(615) 591-8500

Visit Website

Franklin Theatre

Arts & Entertainment

This state-of-the-art, renovated, 1937 Art Deco theatre offers world-class live music, movies and community events. When it opened, it was the only air-conditioned building in town; in its early days, it even served as a Vaudeville-style theatre. The marquee you see today is a faithful reproduction of the original and is especially striking at night.

Add to TripRemoveFranklin Theatre

419 Main St.
Franklin, TN 37064

615-538-2076

Visit Website

The Factory at Franklin

Shopping

Make plans to explore this unique 12-building dining, shopping and enter- tainment complex. You'll find it a welcome break from chain stores and malls while still offering a variety of options; there's even a seasonal farmers market.

Add to TripRemoveThe Factory at Franklin

230 Franklin Rd.
Franklin, TN 37064

615-791-1777

Visit Website